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Visual Arts

Our visual arts program encourages students to use their growing visual language to speak through all media: drawing, printmaking, painting, weaving, sculpting, animation, and photography. As students develop a strong foundation of basic skills, the curriculum helps students increase their understanding of their own perceptions and interpretations, which enables them to tackle larger, more complex ideas in their artwork. With an emphasis on observation, the visual arts curriculum challenges students to describe what they see -- whether internally or externally -- and to build on those observations. Students practice problem-solving, communication, and self-expression while working on projects using a variety of media.

Prekindergarten

Pre-k students begin to grow artistically as they develop a fundamental visual arts “alphabet” – terms such as primary/secondary colors, line, shape and form. Art at the pre-k level is integrated into the program and thematically enriches current units of study. Students are guided to explore and create through the use of a variety of media, materials and art experiences.

Kindergarten

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

First Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Second Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Third Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Fourth Grade

The fourth grade program begins to emphasize a larger and stronger application of the visual vocabulary necessary for higher-order creative thinking. By adding the elements of critique, the concept of transitions, objective and subjective perceptions, and learning through internal and external observations, students demonstrate their deeper understanding of art through the creation of formal and informal pieces.

Fifth Grade

In fifth and sixth grades, the language of art becomes increasingly complex with an introduction to spatial relationships, as well as new and different combinations of fundamental art elements and art principles.

Sixth Grade

In fifth and sixth grades, the language of art becomes increasingly complex with an introduction to spatial relationships, as well as new and different combinations of fundamental art elements and art principles.

Seventh Grade

By seventh and eighth grades, students who choose to take the art portfolio elective have established a solid visual foundation from which they observe and describe their internal and external perceptions.

Eighth Grade

By seventh and eighth grades, students who choose to take the art portfolio elective have established a solid visual foundation from which they observe and describe their internal and external perceptions. The art elective helps committed artists develop a portfolio, which is a necessary component of the application process to an arts magnet high school.