pre-k through eighth grade co-educational school in East Dallas

Visual Arts

With an emphasis on self-expression and process rather than product, the art curriculum challenges students to speak through their art. Just as language is our spoken and written means of communication, art allows us to communicate visually and is a form of self-expression that can be seen, felt and even “listened to.” The visual arts program at St. John's teaches students to be better observers on all levels, and encourages them to visually communicate what they feel.

The program is led by Mrs. Denise Brown, pre-k through fourth grade, and Mr. Martin Delabano, fifth through eighth grade. Both are working artists who show in galleries and are represented in the permanent collections of several museums throughout Texas. Their personal artwork and skills inform their teaching and help them lead by example. It's not uncommon to see one of them drawing on a SMART Board as students follow their lead.

Pre-k

Pre-k students begin to grow artistically as they develop a fundamental visual arts “alphabet” – terms such as primary/secondary colors, line, shape and form. Art at the pre-k level is integrated into the program and thematically enriches current units of study. Students are guided to explore and create through the use of a variety of media, materials and art experiences.

Kindergarten

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

First Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Second Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Third Grade

In kindergarten through third grade, the fundamental visual “alphabet” is woven into a vocabulary from which greater clarity of visual communication evolves. Through the integration of art history, the categories of self-portraiture, still life, landscape and abstractions are developed as a platform on which to construct a larger, more refined internal and external visual vocabulary.

Fourth Grade

The fourth grade program begins to emphasize a larger and stronger application of the visual vocabulary necessary for higher-order creative thinking. By adding the elements of critique, the concept of transitions, objective and subjective perceptions, and learning through internal and external observations, students demonstrate their deeper understanding of art through the creation of formal and informal pieces.

Fifth Grade

In fifth and sixth grades, the language of art becomes increasingly complex with an introduction to spatial relationships, as well as new and different combinations of fundamental art elements and art principles.

Sixth Grade

In fifth and sixth grades, the language of art becomes increasingly complex with an introduction to spatial relationships, as well as new and different combinations of fundamental art elements and art principles.

Seventh Grade

By seventh and eighth grades, students who choose to take the art elective have established a solid visual foundation from which they observe and describe their internal and external perceptions.

Eighth Grade

By seventh and eighth grades, students who choose to take the art elective have established a solid visual foundation from which they observe and describe their internal and external perceptions.


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